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TCC Sponsored Videos

Videos made available here are from two vital resources:
The Transferware Worldwide Lecture Series - free monthly Zoom lectures open to all. Invitations are distributed to the organizations who have expressed interest in participating. These lectures are recorded and made available to current TCC members after the Zoom session. Member login required. A second source are the recorded presentations at TCC Annual Meetings, also available to members with login.

Transferware Worldwide Lecture Series ANNUAL MEETING LECTURES Other Films and Videos

Transferware Worldwide Lecture Series

From Trowel to Table: Ceramic Sherds Inform History Detectives at James Madison’s Montpelier

Lecturer: Leslie Lambour Bouterie, Visiting Curator of Ceramics at James Madison’s Montpelier and Visiting Scholar for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

About the lecture: 

Description: The interpretation of a historic property relies on a highly collaborative team of “history detectives” to bring both the site and the personal stories of its residents to life. Archaeologists, curators, historians, preservationists, and educators tirelessly mine every clue to ensure historical accuracy. In this presentation, we will view the fruits of this collaboration during an armchair tour of Montpelier, with a focus on the impressive collection of ceramics which includes a wide variety of wares and many British transfer-printed patterns.

Montpelier, a property of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is located in central Virginia. It was home to James Madison, fourth president of the United States and his devoted wife Dolley, and also to a large enslaved community. The presidential home which has been meticulously restored and furnished, and the slave dwellings and outbuildings which have been carefully reconstructed and sensitively appointed after comprehensive research, skillfully illuminate the lives of those who lived and worked on the plantation.

Speaker Bio:  Leslie Lambour Bouterie serves as the Visiting Curator of Ceramics at James Madison’s Montpelier and as a Visiting Scholar for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. A career educator and ceramic specialist, she provides consultation services to museums and historic sites; lectures, writes and enthusiastically shares her passion for British ceramics. 

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And His Little Dog, Too: The Enoch Wood Pottery Memorialized on a Mug

Lecturer:  Angelika R. Kuettner, Associate Curator of Ceramics and Glass at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

About the lecture: A recent addition to the collection of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation provided the inspiration for this presentation about the prolific British potter, Enoch Wood. The charming child’s mug, transfer-printed in black, features an image of Wood and his son riding their horses, accompanied by their canine pet. Together, they view the family’s Burslem factory, humming with activity with smoke billowing from the bottle ovens, a testament to its success. This lecture discusses the production of this prolific maker who supplied many American consumers, and features several transfer-printed wares used by Williamsburg residents in the early 1800’s.

About the speaker: Angelika became associate curator of ceramics and glass at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (CWF) in 2019. She came to CWF in 2006 as a graduate student intern for the ceramics and glass department and joined the Foundation as an associate registrar in 2007. She was promoted to associate registrar for imaging and assistant curator of ceramics in 2011 and associate curator of ceramics in 2016. Prior to graduate school at William and Mary she worked for approximately three years as the curatorial assistant at the Reeves Center at Washington and Lee University. She is a proud fellow of the 2010 Attingham Trust Summer School and of the 2016 MESDA Summer Institute. Angelika was coeditor of the 2017 issue of Ceramics in America; she has published and spoken on many topics including the ceramic-manufacturing partnership of Benjamin Leigh and John Allman in 18th-century Boston, mended ceramics in colonial America, and silver lusterware in early 19th century America.

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Floral Prints as Sources for Patterns on Porcelain and Transferware; the Botanical and Gardening Obsession by Patricia (Pat) Knight

In her talk she discusses the role of botany in the 18th century, the research at botanical centers and the popular interest in horticulture that led to books illustrated with botanical prints by Georg Ehret and to the Botanical Magazine published by William Curtis. As a result there was a profusion of botanical decoration on porcelain in the late 18th century. The second half of the lecture concentrated on the botanical and floral prints of the 19th century that were seen on transferware pottery inspired by various garden magazines and books on horticulture.

About the speaker: Patricia Darrell Knight was born in England, studied English and European history at Southampton University and emigrated to the USA with her husband in 1960. Always a keen gardener she gained a landscape certificate in Boston. In 1984 she founded Patrician Antiques in Los Altos specializing in 18th and 19th century porcelain, pottery, and silver. She continues to operate her business on the web. She is a long time member of the Transferware Collectors Club and the San Francisco Ceramic Circle. Her ceramic collecting interests include Staffordshire figures and wares, Regency period porcelains, Jugendstil and modern ceramics. As an enthusiastic gardener she has served on the Boards of the Western Horticulture Society and the Los Altos Garden club.

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Aestheticism on the Dinner Table: The ‘Etching Revival’ and Transferware by Jeffrey Ruda

In 1867-68, French artist Félix Bracquemond etched the transfer prints for Europe’s first table service in a new Japonesque style. The service was a huge critical and commercial success, and was quickly embraced by potters in Staffordshire. The design breakthrough has always been recognized, but not the choice and effect of etched transfer prints instead of engravings. The talk discusses the scope, look, and meaning of this unconventional medium when etching itself was an art-world fashion.
 
Jeffrey Ruda is Professor Emeritus of Art History at the University of California, Davis, where he headed the Art History faculty for twelve years.  His publications include Fra Filippo Lippi:  Life and Work, London & New York, 1993; and The Art of Drawing:  Old Masters from the Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, Flint (MI), 1992, as well as journal articles. He has been a ceramics fan and collector since grad school, and he was president of the San Francisco Ceramic Circle from 2013 to 2019. An active member of the TCC, he is also a contributor to the TCC Database of Patterns and Sources.

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The Trade in British Transferware with the Dutch East Indies 1820-1940 by Jaap Otte

Enjoy this first Transferware Worldwide Series lecture by TCC Member Jaap Otte. In this lecture, Jaap Otte discusses the organization of the trade of European ceramics to the Dutch East Indies during the period 1820 to 1940, as well as the efforts to cater to preferences of the local population.

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Annual Meeting Lectures

Engravers, artists, artisan, designers, authors, interpreters, life, the universe and everything...

By Dr. Richard Halliday 

Engravers, artists, artisan, designers, authors, interpreters, life, the universe and everything... - presented at the TCC 2019 Annual Meeting in Birmingham, AL 

This lecture was made possible by the generous support of the Paul and Gladys Richards Research Grant Program for Studies in British Transferware.

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Overglazed Printed Creamware; Sadler & Green of Liverpool & Their Association with Josiah Wedgwood

By Gaye Blake-Roberts

Overglazed Printed Creamware; Sadler & Green of Liverpool & Their Association with Josiah Wedgwood was presented at the TCC 2019 Annual Meeting in Birmingham, AL. Gaye, now retired, was Curator at the Wedgwood Museum in Barlaston, England, is currently an honorary senior research fellow with the V&A Research Institute, and was recently awarded the M.B.E. This lecture was made possible by the generous support of the Paul and Gladys Richards Research Grant Program for Studies in British Transferware.

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A Transferware Journey in India

A Transferware Journey in India was presented by TCC president Scott Hanson and TCC vice-president Michael Sack during the TCC 2020 Annual Meeting. The presentation shows historic source prints and transferware pieces depicting sites and monuments in India and current photos of the same sites and monuments. Scott, Michael and 11 other transferware collectors toured the sites in India early in 2020 and share insights and stories about the journey while discussing the transferware and source prints.

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Britain’s Development of the Transfer Printing Process in the 18th Century and How it Changed the Industry

Gaye Blake-Roberts’ presentation at the TCC 2019 Annual Meeting in Birmingham, AL explores the development of the transfer printing process for pottery in Great Britain and it’s dramatic effect on the industry. Gaye, now retired, was Curator at the Wedgwood Museum in Barlaston, England, is currently an honorary senior research fellow with the V&A Research Institute, and was recently awarded the M.B.E. This lecture was made possible by the generous support of the Paul and Gladys Richards Research Grant Program for Studies in British Transferware.

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